Content Tagged ‘women’

The Poetry Magazine Podcast: Ashley M. Jones and JoAnn Balingit in Conversation

 

my filipino father’s
art was to christen each child
with a mother’s memory

 

from “Tanaga: Song Where Every Filipinx Person Is Standing by the Ocean”  –JoAnn Balingit @jabalingit

POETRY magazine (@poetrymagazine) July/August 2021

 

This week, Ashley M. Jones and JoAnn Balingit talk about where poetry lives in the face of loss and grief, and how that intimate place can be shared. What does it mean to let the poem, the tree, be a bridge between us, between our identities, between the living and the dead?

 

 

Read  Tanaga: Song Where Every Filipinx Person Is Standing by the Ocean from the July/August 2021 issue of Poetry. And listen to more of The Poetry Magazine Podcast! (I love Faisal Mohyuddin’s poem “Allah Castles” in the May issue of Poetry.)

Practicing Poetry: Writing in Spring

Practicing Poetry: Writing into Spring April 7 – June 23    5:00-6:30pm eastern

 Free

       . . . from this yard I have been composing a great speech, that I write about myself, that it’s good to be a poet, that I look like the drawing of a house that was pencilled by a child, that curiously, I miss him and my mind is not upon the Pleaides, that I love the ocean and its foam against the sky                                  –Lisa Jarnot, “The Bridge”  

“Practicing Poetry” spring sessions begin April 7, 2021. We’ll meet on Wednesday nights 5 – 6:30pm EDT for six online sessions through June 23rd, over Zoom. Students can register for bi-monthly sessions here to receive the login link. Please register for each Wednesday you wish to attend. Here’s permission to compose a great …

Ink Knows No Borders: Poems of the Immigrant and Refugee Experience

I am so happy to have a poem in this beautiful anthology, Ink Knows No Borders: Poems of the Immigrant and Refugee Experience. I’m reading at the DC launch March 15! More info

The collection features 65 poems and a foreword by poet Javier Zamora. Zamora crossed the U.S.-Mexican border unaccompanied at the age of nine.

It’s an honor to be included alongside poets whose lives and words illuminate “issues confronting first- and second- generation young adult immigrants and refugees.” To name a few: Elizabeth Acevedo, Erika L. Sánchez, Samira Ahmed, Chen Chen, Ocean Vuong, Fatimah Asghar, Carlos Andrés Gómez, Bao Phi, Kaveh Akbar, Hala Alyan, and Ada Limón.

Ink Knows No Borders, edited by Alyssa Raymond and Patrice Vecchione, is available from Seven Stories Press March 2019.

Ink Knows No Borders is a timely anthology about an ancient experience: immigration, homesickness, identity and social exclusion. The anthology is “a hopeful, beautiful, …

Westmoreland Arts & Heritage poetry and short story contest

I’m looking forward to reading poems for this contest!  I’ll serve as poetry juror for The 45th annual Westmoreland Arts and Heritage Festival Poetry and Short Story Contest.

If you’re interested (I hope so!) mark you calendar. Submissions are open through January 18, 2019 (postmark deadline).

Winners in both poetry and short story categories receive a Westmoreland Award: $200 plus an invitation to read their works onstage. Cash prizes and stage invitations go to 1st, 2nd and 3rd place poems and stories too. 

The Westmoreland Arts and Heritage Festival takes place July 4, 5, 6, & 7, 2019, with performing arts, diverse cultural events, foods from many traditions, fine arts, music and crafts. Latrobe, location of the festival site, is southwest of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Here’s more information & a link to download an entry form.

It’s the new year, so start sending out your poems!

 

 

Resist Much / Obey Little: Inaugural Poems to the Resistance

“we can’t build a wall. we can only spout pure water again and again and drown his lies.” –Eileen Myles

RESIST MUCH/OBEY LITTLE: Poems to the Resistance, Dispatch Editions 2017. 

“This anthology represents a model for activism and mobility in a time of political emergency.” –Review by Dante Di Stefano, Resist Much / Obey Little at Best American Poetry.

Michael Boughn and Kent Johnson brought together eighteen editors from diverse aesthetic and cultural backgrounds to solicit and curate the work of more than 350 poets in roughly two months. Boughn and Johnson note in their introduction essay “Poetry and Resistance,” the book “is first and foremost a collective, insurgent call that is part and parcel of a sovereign people’s challenge to a narcissistic oligarch and his lackeys, who smirk now from their temporary perches of power. Its pages are bound in direct, literal ways, to the historic worldwide marches of January 22nd—and they stand as …

How do artists & illustrators push beyond traditional narrative?

In  Grand Vocabulary: American Contemporary Illustration, an exhibit at The Delaware Contemporary (through November 12, 2016), artists and illustrators “demonstrate the increasing freedom contemporary illustrators are given to push their craft.”

I am excited to have four of my poems wonderfully treated in paintings by artist Kris Chau — such gorgeous color and line! She worked for several years, I am told, as a designer for Free People/Urban Outfitters and these illustrations reflect her love of draping the human figure.  Here’s her illustration of my poem, Frac/tions.

She chose to illustrate “Complete Boy’s Armor” and “Here’s My List” from Words for House Story, as well as a newer poem, “Limón Homage,” a finalist for Rhino Poetry‘s 2016 Founder’s Prize.

I had not realized until I saw this painting how the boy in “Complete Boys’ Armor” is a warrior despite the poem’s yearning for peace if not pacifism. We live in a violent …

Finalist for RHINO POETRY’s Founder’s Prize

I am happy to announce my poem “Limón Homage” was selected as a finalist

for RHINO’s annual Founder’s Prize and will appear in the new issue in April.  Congratulations to Greg Grummer, winner of the 2016 Founder’s Prize for “The Great Butterfly Collapse” and to Runners-Up Katie Hartsock and Teresa Dzieglewicz!

It’s cool that my friend Maggie Rowe from Newark also has a poem in this issue–Newark, Delaware poets on the march! Her poem and mine are among the ten finalists. But hers has the more intriguing title, “Like a Solemn Friend Inebriate with Rain.” Can’t wait to read it.

“Limón Homage” is dedicated to Sema Mellian, a wonderful woman and painter whose parents survived the Armenian genocide, and who painted the still life that inspired this poem. My friend Sema passed away in September.

Thanks to Angela Narcisso Torres, Ralph Hamilton and the RHINO editors.

Event: In the Company of Poets Laureate

On October 11, I will be “In the Company of Laureates,” hosted by the Poetry Society of Virginia and Write by the Rails, the Prince William Chapter of the Virginia Writers Club.

I’ll be there to offer poems and ideas as part of a panel on “Inspiration and Experimentation” with Virginia poets laureate emeritae, Carolyn Kreiter-Fronda and Sophia Starnes; and Prince William Poet Laureate Zan Hailey.

More than 20 current and former Poets Laureate from Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, Virginia and West Virginia will celebrate American poetry.

In the Company of Laureates takes place from 1 p.m. – 5 p.m. on October 11 at the Hylton Performing Arts Center on George Mason University’s Science and Technology Campus in Manassas.

Poets and poetry enthusiasts are invited to join us for workshops, panel discussions, open mics and more. There will be programs and activities for teens throughout the event.

Supporters are offering …

At The Camargo Foundation on Mother’s Day: Alone?

On the first Mother’s Day I have spent alone in some 30 years of mothering, I took a long morning walk to the spring-fed turquoise waters of Calanques de Cassis.

then spent several hours writing. Mes enfants me manquent, I miss my kids, my mind and my body whispered.  So I replied, “Yes. But I adore being alone in this quiet fishing village, in residence with myself.”

Life at The Camargo Foundation was above all quite and private: womblike. A week into my month-long Bread Loaf Bakeless Camargo Residency, I wrote on being away by myself in a beautiful place–a Mother’s Day article for my local newspaper, where I write an occasional column “On Poetry.”

In the article, I included two poems that speak from a mother’s perspective, one by Camargo fellow Bonnie Bolling, who has four boys; and the other poem about having breakfast en plein air

Yes to poetry books! joining YesYes Books

I am happy to announce I’ve joined YesYes Books, an independent publisher of poetry books & the journal Vinyl Poetry, as an Assistant Editor in Book Development, focusing on eBook development & distribution.

Right now, I am researching the collection development landscape of public and school libraries, where development involves the acquisition of poetry and eBooks. That particular landscape undergoes an earthquake a week, followed by rapidly rebuilt skylines. I will also work with Rob MacDonald and publisher KMA Sullivan on furthering a wonderful project: E.P.I.C.–teams of poets in the schools, right where they’re needed!

This independent press is driven by a stellar group of creative people Sullivan has been gathering together over the past four years to promote poets, poetry, and poetry-in-education–by designing beautiful books that offer compelling work. YesYes is committed to social justice and educational outreach and the relationship between poet and artist. And to promoting …

On a tough day, Rita Dove delivers the last word

Washington DC writer and teacher, Chloe Yelena Miller invited me to be guest blogger on April 30, last day of National Poetry Month 2013. A chilly month, a tough month, a gorgeous month, a month honoring poetry.

Here in the mid-Atlantic, April ended with blue sky, brilliant stars, trees heavy in blossom, spring flowers bursting into every crystal of sunlight. I attended poetry readings all month long during April and Rita Dove’s, most of all, served me. In the piece, I reflect on how her poems worked me over. A few hours earlier, I had learned my son was hunkered in his New Bedford apartment in a city under lock-down, during a tough week for all of us, for many reasons. As Dove said toward the end of her reading, she had taken us up and up, reading poems about family and dancing and identity–and she paused to decide:

“Should …