Content Tagged ‘resistance’

Ink Knows No Borders: Poems of the Immigrant and Refugee Experience

I am so happy to have a poem in this beautiful anthology, Ink Knows No Borders: Poems of the Immigrant and Refugee Experience.

The collection features 65 poems and a foreword by poet Javier Zamora. Zamora crossed the U.S.-Mexican border unaccompanied at the age of nine.

It’s an honor to be included alongside poets whose lives and words illuminate “issues confronting first- and second- generation young adult immigrants and refugees.” To name a few: Elizabeth Acevedo, Erika L. Sánchez, Samira Ahmed, Chen Chen, Ocean Vuong, Fatimah Asghar, Carlos Andrés Gómez, Bao Phi, Kaveh Akbar, Hala Alyan, and Ada Limón.

Alyssa Raymond and Patrice Vecchione edited. The book comes out from Seven Stories Press this March.

Ink Knows No Borders is a timely anthology about an ancient experience: immigration, homesickness, identity and social exclusion. World Poetry Slam Champion and Honorary Goodwill Ambassador for UNHCR, Emtithal Mahmoud, wrote the afterword. UNHCR is the UN …

Resist Much / Obey Little: Inaugural Poems to the Resistance

“we can’t build a wall. we can only spout pure water again and again and drown his lies.” –Eileen Myles

RESIST MUCH/OBEY LITTLE: Poems to the Resistance, Dispatch Editions 2017. 

“This anthology represents a model for activism and mobility in a time of political emergency.” –Review by Dante Di Stefano, Resist Much / Obey Little at Best American Poetry.

Michael Boughn and Kent Johnson brought together eighteen editors from diverse aesthetic and cultural backgrounds to solicit and curate the work of more than 350 poets in roughly two months. Boughn and Johnson note in their introduction essay “Poetry and Resistance,” the book “is first and foremost a collective, insurgent call that is part and parcel of a sovereign people’s challenge to a narcissistic oligarch and his lackeys, who smirk now from their temporary perches of power. Its pages are bound in direct, literal ways, to the historic worldwide marches of January 22nd—and they stand as …